There’s no “I” in Team

 

We’ve heard it all before– there’s no “I” in team. But how should business owners and professionals apply this cliché to their staff? It’s essential to understand that business is about collaboration- whether it’s B2B, B2C or internal. If you can’t create a solid team that is unified with one mission and a strategy to meet it, then how much success can you realistically expect?

Sometimes it seems easier to let one person carry the load or assign a task to one exceptional staffer. However, taking this route not only creates a sense of “favoritism” or isolation, but it also impedes the progress for growth within an organization. Utilizing your staff’s strengths and abilities is a great way to complete projects more accurately, prevent overwhelming your staff members and learn more about who can contribute in a time of need. Although you hire people to fulfill specific roles, allowing them to be a part of a team and work in a different capacity can build morale and open doors to new opportunities for you and your employees. So, although you may be tempted to delegate to one person, or even manage the task on your own, use your team to get the job done.  Here are a few tips on building a team and delegating responsibly:

1) Add variety in your team— A good team should have people that come from different professional backgrounds. This way, everyone can contribute to the team with their own expertise and strengths. Ask each person on your team to list their top strengths and their top weaknesses. Match this information to the requirements of your project to determine which person should handle a specific responsibility.
2) Make collaboration mandatory— If your team doesn’t know that they are required to work together, chances are they just won’t work together. Make it known that each team member is required to pull their own weight, but they’re also required to build project-based relationships with others. Just make sure you find the right balance between being an enforcer and wanting team spirit.  As a courtesy, have an open-door policy for people who don’t want to be a part of the team to feel comfortable expressing why. Their hesitation to play a role in the team’s success could be valid, in which case, re-evaluating a team member’s contribution may be necessary.
3) Create benchmarks for individual members: How will you know if every member is playing their part? Benchmarks! Establish a few deliverables at different intervals of the project that require your team members to prove that they are contributing towards the project’s success. The benchmarks don’t have to be huge, but it should be a recognizable effort or output that shows collaboration and progress.
4) Set rules: The most successful path from Point A to Point B involves adherence to some rules. Projects can get messy. You have egos, and slackers, deadlines, budgets and frustrations. The best way to get through any of this is with rules that promote motivation to get through the project. Create rules that enforce respect and togetherness, but also promote creativity, a comfortable environment, group activities and breaks.
5) Reward the team and the individuals— No matter if the project succeeds or fails, multiple people tried their hardest to get it off of the drawing board and they should be appreciated for their effort. Reward your team with an early dismissal, treat them to lunch, give them awards or something that lets them know that you appreciate their hard work and you would like to work with them again.

These are just a few tips on getting people to collaborate respectively in teams. For more tips, please contact me. Do you have tips of your own? Share them! I’d like to hear your feedback.

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A Plan to Succeed

How to develop the ultimate to-do list

Planning is an essential part of getting the most from any task or goal. This is especially true for running a business, charting a professional path or managing a project. Planning, although initially time consuming, allows you to dissect a situation, prepare each step and monitor the growth and development of your goal.
When it comes to planning, the number one strategy is to use a to-do list. A to-do list normally outlines a number of tasks to be achieved in a specified time frame. The great thing about to-do lists is that you can reference them to determine your progress. However, if your list doesn’t provide you with a brief but detailed path to an end-result, you may end up with a dysfunctional course or unreachable goals.
A highly functional to-do list can contain a few elements to keep your momentum going and gage your success with a task. Here are a few tips about creating a meaningful to-do list for your next project, task or schedule:

1) Decide what your ultimate goal is: You can create a bunch of tasks that have no relationship to each other. That’s not a to-do list. That’s a regular list or an act of brainstorming. An effective to-do list should be tied to an objective and should be quantifiable such as “Get 100 registrants to XYZ event” or “Get 5 new clients from my sales presentations”. Defining your end result first will help you create a list of actions that are designed to help you achieve your goal.
2) Time should be of the essence: Every goal is tied to a time frame. Otherwise, you could spend days, weeks or even longer trying to achieve something. Put a time stamp on your goal, but make sure it’s realistic. If your goal is “to get 100 registrants to XYZ event” and you’d like that to happen in 2 hours, is that realistic? If you limit your opportunity to achieve a goal, you’re going to frustrate yourself and determine the goal to be unreachable. That’s counter-effective planning. Give yourself wiggle room, but put a definite (short-term) end to a solution.
3) Gather your materials: You can’t possibly achieve a goal within a specific time frame without having everything you need. Make a list of essential items that aid in getting the task done. If your goal is “To get 100 registrants to the XYZ event in two weeks”, what materials would help you achieve this goal? Materials could include technology, printed items, people, resources, personal items, etc. List only what you absolutely need to get the job done.
4) Figure out your priorities: Some lists can go on and on with action items. Some lists have tasks that can be reserved for later goals. Make sure your list contains action items that are critical elements in achieving your immediate goal.
A trick in establishing a priority item is
a) Can this goal be achieved if I omit this task from my list? (Your answer should be NO)
b) If I don’t start this right now, will it prevent me from reaching my goal? (Your answer should be YES)
c) Can I get this done with a few simple steps or in a short period of time? (Your answer should be YES)
d) Will doing this task free up additional time or resources? (Your answer should be YES)
e) Do I need to wait on other people to get this done?  (Your answer should be NO)
5) Proceed with enthusiasm: Once you have a goal, a time frame, a list of materials and your priorities are in order, you should eagerly pursue your goals. There’s no need for trepidation or wondering if you’ll achieve everything on your list. If you face your tasks with an optimism about achieving the bigger goal, you’ll have all of the momentum needed to accompany a well-planned list.

These are just a few tips on creating the ultimate to-do list. For more tips, please contact me. Have you put these tips to use? Do you have a few tips of your own? Share them! I’d like to hear your feedback.