There’s no “I” in Team

 

We’ve heard it all before– there’s no “I” in team. But how should business owners and professionals apply this cliché to their staff? It’s essential to understand that business is about collaboration- whether it’s B2B, B2C or internal. If you can’t create a solid team that is unified with one mission and a strategy to meet it, then how much success can you realistically expect?

Sometimes it seems easier to let one person carry the load or assign a task to one exceptional staffer. However, taking this route not only creates a sense of “favoritism” or isolation, but it also impedes the progress for growth within an organization. Utilizing your staff’s strengths and abilities is a great way to complete projects more accurately, prevent overwhelming your staff members and learn more about who can contribute in a time of need. Although you hire people to fulfill specific roles, allowing them to be a part of a team and work in a different capacity can build morale and open doors to new opportunities for you and your employees. So, although you may be tempted to delegate to one person, or even manage the task on your own, use your team to get the job done.  Here are a few tips on building a team and delegating responsibly:

1) Add variety in your team— A good team should have people that come from different professional backgrounds. This way, everyone can contribute to the team with their own expertise and strengths. Ask each person on your team to list their top strengths and their top weaknesses. Match this information to the requirements of your project to determine which person should handle a specific responsibility.
2) Make collaboration mandatory— If your team doesn’t know that they are required to work together, chances are they just won’t work together. Make it known that each team member is required to pull their own weight, but they’re also required to build project-based relationships with others. Just make sure you find the right balance between being an enforcer and wanting team spirit.  As a courtesy, have an open-door policy for people who don’t want to be a part of the team to feel comfortable expressing why. Their hesitation to play a role in the team’s success could be valid, in which case, re-evaluating a team member’s contribution may be necessary.
3) Create benchmarks for individual members: How will you know if every member is playing their part? Benchmarks! Establish a few deliverables at different intervals of the project that require your team members to prove that they are contributing towards the project’s success. The benchmarks don’t have to be huge, but it should be a recognizable effort or output that shows collaboration and progress.
4) Set rules: The most successful path from Point A to Point B involves adherence to some rules. Projects can get messy. You have egos, and slackers, deadlines, budgets and frustrations. The best way to get through any of this is with rules that promote motivation to get through the project. Create rules that enforce respect and togetherness, but also promote creativity, a comfortable environment, group activities and breaks.
5) Reward the team and the individuals— No matter if the project succeeds or fails, multiple people tried their hardest to get it off of the drawing board and they should be appreciated for their effort. Reward your team with an early dismissal, treat them to lunch, give them awards or something that lets them know that you appreciate their hard work and you would like to work with them again.

These are just a few tips on getting people to collaborate respectively in teams. For more tips, please contact me. Do you have tips of your own? Share them! I’d like to hear your feedback.

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